Are Tilers in Demand?

Job security is a big worry for most people, and we live in a society that changes so quickly. Technology gives us so much, but as it evolves, people wonder if their chosen career will even exist in a few years.

This post will explore whether tiling is a viable career option and reveal the demand for tilers in the UK.

Why Is It Important to Consider Your Career Options?

The internet was a relatively new prospect just twenty years ago, and smart technology was nothing but a possibility. So much has changed, and our lives are dominated by technology, including how we eat, socialise, relax and work.

As AI (Artificial Intelligence) gets more advanced, specific industries will suffer. According to TechRepublic, in 20 years, the retail, insurance and transportation industries will cease to exist and instead will be automated with AI, so it’s no wonder that people are worried about their futures.

One industry that will continue to thrive in the construction sector. As you can see from the data published by the National Office For Statistics, the sector remains stable, and there was only a 1% drop in building work during the Covid-19 pandemic.

If you’re looking for stability and a long-term assurance that you won’t be queueing up at the Job Centre, working in construction opens up plenty of career opportunities and broadens your prospects.

Tiling is one of the most popular jobs within the construction industry because it gives people the flexibility to work for themselves or become part of a larger team of builders.

An article published by Marketing Donut shows that tiling is, in fact, one of the most in-demand skills. Still, there’s a shortage of skilled professionals that can complete complex jobs and maintain the standards set by large construction companies.

It’s clear that tiling is a popular industry, but you need to work hard to ensure you can provide your clients with clean finishes and perfect your skills when it comes to complex jobs.

What Skills Do Tilers Need?

Tilers should have a range of skills, including strong attention to detail, working with tools, and understanding tiling techniques. However, customers will also expect you to provide them with support and advice on which tiles are best and what they can afford for their budget.

If you plan to go into business alone, you’ll need to focus on your business acumen and handle your finances. Time management, the ability to multitask and manage others, is essential to running a successful business. While many tilers decide to branch out, some prefer working for others or operating as sole traders.

Most importantly, tilers need to have a lot of dedication to their craft and accept critique from construction managers and customers. It’s an intricate job, and of all the construction trades, tiling requires more creativity and the ability to work well with your hands.

As new trends emerge, your customers will demand more from you, and only the most committed tilers will be able to offer a complete service.

What Can You Do With a Tiler Qualification?

Gaining a tiling qualification can be highly beneficial to your future, especially when you think about how many people use tiles in their homes. There is a range of courses you can do, but we always advise our clients that it’s best to focus on qualifications that build your knowledge and let you take on more challenging roles.

Many of our tilers go on to start their own business or work for a construction company, and there are plenty of opportunities to build a successful career. Some also choose to specialise in specific areas, including:

● Tile Installation
● Grout Specialist
● Tiling Instructor

There’s also the opportunity to progress as a site supervisor or manager within the construction industry. Whatever you choose, it’s essential to invest in tiling courses that will equip you with the skills you need to succeed.

Will Tiling Continue to Be a Popular Career?

It might surprise you to learn that the art of tiling began over 25,000 years ago, to 4700 BC in Egypt. The Romans also used ceramic tiles for much of their building work, and archaeologists found old tiles used by the Romans at a site in Wittenham in 2004.

Professional tilers also received a lot of work during Mediaeval times because they were particularly popular in churches, which continued until the 16th century.

After that time, tiling lost its popularity, but it would make a comeback during the Victorian period.

The industrial revolution made it much easier to mass-produce ceramic tiles, and it’s probably the most important era for us tilers.

Today, most homes use some form of tiling, and it’s prevalent in bathrooms and kitchens. Think about every pub or restaurant you’ve been to in the past year. You’ll notice that most have tiles in the bathroom or kitchen, so there’s always going to be a demand for tilers.

There are so many tiling options available today, and contemporary tiles can come in a sleek and simple design or be an intricate spectacle. Depending on your customer’s preferences, you might be asked to work with small tiles and keep to a particular pattern, so improving your skills is central to making it as a professional tiler.

Are You New to Tiling?

If you’re considering a career as a tiler, it’s essential to understand that you need to develop your practical skills and knowledge. While many online courses are available, they won’t give you the hands-on experience you need to make it a tiler.

We offer a range of in-house tiling courses designed to equip you with everything you need to build a successful career. Our entry-level course is perfect if you’d like to explore a career in tiling or complete a home renovation, but we also offer professional development courses for experienced tilers.

Studying with us means you get to learn from tilers with years of experience at a cost-effective price. Your learning journey will help you get that dream job, set up as a sole trader or start a construction business.

Contact us here today to learn more.

7 Benefits of Using Porcelain Tiles

Porcelain tiles are known for their aesthetic appeal and versatility. While they achieve a high-end allure, they’re one of the cheaper floor and wall options available, which is why so many people use them.

In this post, we’ll reveal some incredible benefits of using porcelain tiles. Let’s dive straight in.

Low Maintenance

Kitchens and bathrooms are high traffic areas, and they have to deal with potential water damage and food stains. If you have pets or children, you’ll know all too well the mess they seem to attract! Whether it’s muddy shoe and paw prints or knocking things over, your flooring can take a real beating.

Porcelain is naturally stain resistant, so it’s easy to clean. All you need to do is give it a sweep and wipe, and it’s clean. While stone tiles also have stain resistant qualities, they need to be sealed, making porcelain much easier to maintain.

Highly Durable

If you love ceramic tiles but are worried about their durability, porcelain tiles are the best for your needs. Porcelain isn’t as durable as natural stone, but it can still last you for up to 20 years, which is why it’s such a great option.

As porcelain doesn’t require any sealant, it’s easy to install, and because porcelain is so versatile, it can resemble natural stone – but it is a much cheaper option.

All tiles are rated on their durability, so if you manage to find a porcelain tile with a high rating, it can last for around 50 years.

Less Wear and Tear

Every household has high traffic areas, and you’ll often notice the flooring in your living room, kitchen, and bathroom wears down quickly. This is because they’re more susceptible to water and food spillages.

Porcelain is easy to clean, and it’s also a highly durable material. While it still needs basic maintenance, you’ll find that porcelain tiles are much better than carpets and laminate flooring.

Fireproof

Carpet and laminate flooring are both highly flammable, so if there’s even a small fire in your household, it can quickly spread and cause more damage. Porcelain is a fire-resistant material, which means it’s not going to catch fire and won’t produce smoke or fumes.

While fires can still happen in any household, porcelain isn’t flammable, so it can limit the damage caused to your property.

Safety Features

One of the main draws of porcelain is how shiny it is and the fantastic finish it offers. However, while it might seem that porcelain must be slippery, most manufacturers make sure they add slip-resistant glazing to ensure the tiles are safe.

It’s usually a gritty texture, which stops people from slipping on the tiles. The glazing is unnoticeable, so you can still enjoy the aesthetic appeal of porcelain tiles without worrying about accidents.

For households with young children or older relatives, this is invaluable because slipping on the kitchen and bathroom floor is one of the leading household accidents in the UK.

By installing porcelain flooring, you can rest assured that people won’t slip on the tiles, particularly useful in bathrooms.

Low Moisture Absorption

The biggest worry for the flooring in your kitchen and bathroom is how it will withstand water damage. Bathrooms particularly have a lot to deal with, especially if you have children and pets. Luckily, porcelain tiles are a cost-effective solution if you want waterproof tiles.

With a high water-resistant rating, porcelain tiles can withstand kitchens and bathrooms easily, so you won’t need to worry about too much maintenance.

Versatility

Porcelain tiles come in all shapes, sizes and designs, so there’s something for everyone. Modern technology has given us so many incredible inventions, and if you want to benefit from the style and flexibility of this durable material, you won’t be disappointed.

For example, if you like the rustic look, you can choose wood style porcelain, and marble themed porcelain looks great in contemporary interior design.

You can also replicate the natural stone look and add a touch of luxury to your flooring. There’s so much you can do with porcelain tiles, and they’re a more cost-effective solution than other flooring types.

Things to Consider

Whether you’re buying porcelain tiles for your home or are a professional tiler looking for practical but stylish solutions for your clients, porcelain is an excellent all-around solution. Not only is it cost-effective, but it looks high-end, so nobody regards it as a budget option.

Here are some things you should consider when deciding whether to invest in porcelain tiles.

Are you aware of tiling practices?

Tiling is a specialist job, and while porcelain is easy to work with, you’ll still need to know what you’re doing. If you’re not a professional tiler, we recommend taking a fast track tiling course to improve your knowledge and give you practical experience.

Even if you don’t plan on becoming a specialist tiler, you can use the skills as a side hustle or renovate other rooms.

Is authenticity really important?

For some people, nothing but the real thing will do – even if it’s more expensive! Natural stone is a costly material because it requires sealant to make it waterproof. While it might seem better to use it over porcelain, nobody will be able to tell the difference, and porcelain is a lot easier to work with and maintain.

What’s your budget?

Porcelain tiles come in a range of designs, so there’s something for everyone. But the sheer diversity of the tiles also applies to the cost. You can get budget tiles and high-end designs, so it’s best to make sure you know how many tiles you’ll need and set aside some extra money for spares.

Doing this means you’ll be able to stay within budget, instead of spending more money than you planned.

Hopefully, this post gives you some great ideas of why porcelain tiles are an excellent solution for both households and workplaces. If you’d like to learn more about our courses, please feel free to contact our friendly team. Our trainers are always available to offer advice and signpost you to the right course.

What is the Strongest Tile For Floors?

Tiles are a cost-effective solution for any wall or floor because they last for a long time, are relatively simple to source and have a magnetic aesthetic appeal. Homeowners choose tiles because they provide long-term value for money, and with so many designs and materials available, it isn’t easy to know where to start. 

One of the most important things you should consider when purchasing new tiles is whether they’ll be strong enough for your floor.

This post will look at the best tiles for floors and the essential things you should look for. Whether you’re renovating your property or are a professional tiler that wants to give customers the best possible service, this post will clear everything up. 

Why Does Tile Strength Matter?

When it comes to redecorating, there’s always an initial investment, but people are willing to spend money on their homes because it’s the place they sleep, relax, and raise a family. The decor and materials people choose depending on their preferences and available budget. 

For example, families with pets or young children will probably avoid white carpets, and older adults might prefer carpet to laminate flooring because there’s less chance of slipping. 

But tile strength also makes a big difference to how long your flooring will last, especially in high-traffic rooms. Most people use tiles for their kitchen and bathroom, which are cooking, cleaning and eating areas. 

Most kitchens also lead to the back garden, which means you also have to contend with people and animals regularly walking across the floor. 

If you want to make a sound investment in your tiles, it’s essential that you consider which strength you’ll need. 

Let’s take a look at the different tile types and how they measure up for high-traffic rooms. 

Natural Stone Tiles 

Most people choose natural stone tiles because they’re so attractive and add an air of elegance to any property. The most popular stone tile types include granite, limestone, travertine, marble and slate, but only two are suitable for high-traffic floor areas. 

Both slate and granite are strong enough to withstand kitchens and bathrooms, and as long as you buy them from a reputable manufacturer, they’ll last for a long time. 

While slate has a textured surface, some tiles are smoothed down to create a uniform look. If you’re a fan of darker tones, you’ll love slate, but it’s not very versatile in terms of designs. 

Granite is more speckled in appearance, and it’s incredibly strong when it’s polished, so you can be sure that scratching your granite flooring will take a lot of effort. 

Ceramic Tiles 

There’s always some confusion about whether ceramic and porcelain tiles are the same, and the explanation isn’t exactly straightforward. Most manufacturers class ceramic tiles as tiles that contain clay and are kiln-fired, so porcelain is technically a subgroup of ceramic tiles. 

While both go through a similar process, ceramic tiles are quicker to produce, which means they have less strength than porcelain. 

Most people use ceramic tiles for decoration or on their walls, not on floors, because ceramic isn’t durable. The material itself is easy to cut through, so while ceramics are great if you want to make an artistic statement, we’d recommend you don’t use them for your flooring. 

Porcelain Tiles 

Porcelain tiles are kiln-fired at high temperatures, and manufacturers use the dust-pressing method to strengthen each tile. Doing this makes the porcelain a lot more durable, and they’re also ideal for outdoor areas because the tiles don’t absorb much water. 

Of all the tile types available, porcelain is the strongest, beating wood and even cement, so it’s easy to see why so many households choose it. Each tile has a rating from the Porcelain Enamel Institute that lets people know if it’s suitable for commercial properties. 

While ceramic tiles have a low PEI rating, porcelain tiles are ranked between PEI 3-6, all of which are suitable for any foot traffic. 

Things to Consider 

So, now you know about the different tile types available for your flooring needs, it’s time to decide. Here are some things you should consider before you buy your tiles. 

Do I Have the Skill?

Tiling is an intricate task, and some types of tiles are easier to work with than others. Porcelain is a high-strength tile, which means it can be challenging to cut, and many people will struggle to lay it correctly. 

However, as porcelain is such a quality material, we recommend you either use the services of a specialist tiler or take advantage of porcelain tiling courses, which give you the vital skills and hands-on experience to succeed in any tiling tasks. 

What’s The Budget? 

When choosing floor tiles, your budget is a significant factor in decision-making because you need to balance price with quality. There’s no point in buying cheap ceramic tiles only to find they crack a few months down the line, so think about how long you want your flooring to last. 

In our opinion, it’s always better to spend a little bit more money upfront if it means your tiles will last a few years longer. Ultimately, it’s your decision, but while porcelain and natural stone might be more expensive choices, they do offer higher levels of durability. 

Are My Needs Likely to Change?

Are you planning on having children soon? Or how about adopting a pet? Ceramic tiles might seem like a good idea at first, but if your household is likely to change, then it’s best to choose a tile type that will grow with your family. 

Pets and children have two things in common; they need a lot of care and make a lot of mess. Porcelain tiles are designed to withstand heavy footsteps, spillages and everything else your kitchen and bathroom could be exposed to. 

The Bottom Line 

Tiled floors can enhance the aesthetics of your home and make a real statement. Hopefully, this post gives you an idea of the strongest tile for floors, and you’ll be able to go away and choose a design and colour that suits your decor preferences. 

Don’t forget to follow our blog. We regularly post essential tips, tricks and trade secrets for the world of tiling.

What Is The Best – Tiles Vs Laminate Flooring?

We’re lucky that we have so many flooring options, but kitchens and bathrooms require special attention. A carpet isn’t going to work in either of these rooms because they’re high traffic areas susceptible to water damage. 

The primary flooring types for bathrooms and kitchens are tiles and laminate. But which is better? We’re about to find out.

Floor Tiles: The Basics 

In general, floor tiles fall into two categories; natural and man-made. Natural tiles are usually manufactured from stones such as slate, onyx and marble. They look stunning but do require some maintenance. 

Manufactured tiles are undoubtedly the most popular because they have the durability that traditional stone tiles lack. You can choose between ceramic or porcelain floor tiles, and both come in a range of designs and colours. 

Many manufacturers use tiles to recreate popular materials without durability issues. One example is wood, which isn’t ideal for a kitchen or bathroom because both are high-moisture areas, and wood can rot. 

Tiles are so popular because of their versatility, which is why so many households choose them. But what about laminate flooring? 

Laminate Flooring: The Basics 

Laminate flooring is another popular material because it resembles natural wood but is much easier to maintain. Manufacturers layer materials together to create boards, and many households choose it because laminate is so cheap. 

High-density fibreboard forms the bottom layer; then, a photo-realistic layer sits on top. The realistic layer usually resembles either dark or light wood, and most laminate boards have a top layer that protects the design from spills, dirt, pets and children. 

Tile or Laminate: Which is Better?

To understand whether tile or laminate is better for your needs, it’s essential to review the pros and cons of each. Everything from cost to durability should play a part in your decision, so let’s dive in and settle this matter once and for all. 

The Cost 

The base cost of both laminate and tiles is similar and depends on the manufacturer and design you choose. Kitchen floor tiles can cost as little as £10 per square metre, and laminate flooring is the same. 

Regardless of your budget, you’ll find a range of flooring options to suit your needs, so when it comes to the base costs, there’s not much difference between laminate and tiles. 

We should mention, though, that natural stone tiles are always going to be more expensive. If you’re looking for a cost-effective option, it’s probably best to stick to ceramic and porcelain tiles. 

When it comes to installing your flooring, tiles require a bit more effort – but they’re designed to last longer. The difference isn’t significant, and you’ll probably pay around £20 extra for tile installation. 

Durability

Tiles are known for their durability, and as long as you install them right, they’ll withstand spills, stains and traffic – which is essential for kitchens and bathrooms. Laminate is relatively durable, but compared to tiles, it doesn’t come close. 

While some manufacturers are creating weather and waterproof laminate flooring, it doesn’t offer the same level of durability as tiles. 

As long as you use proper sealing techniques to ensure your tiles have the stability they require, you’ll enjoy them for years to come and won’t need to worry about replacing them. 

Repairs 

Laminate flooring is notoriously difficult to repair because each board locks with another to form a floor surface. While this sounds relatively simple, it can cause problems if you need to repair or replace a board. 

You’ll have to take the system apart, which will prove to be an absolute nightmare if the damaged board is in the middle of the floor. You could also end up damaging other boards in the process, which means more expense in the long term. 

Tiles are much easier to repair because each is surrounded by grouting, so you can easily remove one tile without disrupting the whole system. 

Value 

We all know by now that it’s the small elements that make the most significant difference – especially when it comes to selling your home. Potential buyers will pay attention to the windows, wallpaper and flooring, so it’s crucial to consider whether tiles or laminate will add more value to your property. 

Many people still consider laminate to be of poor quality and a cheap alternative to natural wood. Tiles, however, add an element of luxury to your kitchen or bathroom, and people will be more likely to view your property in a positive light. 

Maintenance 

Both tile and laminate flooring require minimal maintenance, but you do need to keep them clean. Laminate is easy to clean, and you can run a mop over the surface without needing to do anything else. 

Tiles have grouting, which secures them into place, and you should make an effort to clean them once a month. The everyday cleaning of your tiles is similar to laminate, and their sturdy design means you can hoover, mop and steam clean them. 

While some people might find cleaning the grout to be a tedious task, there are electric brushes that speed up the process. 

Diversity 

It goes without saying that tiles are incredibly versatile, and you can find designs to suit your style preferences. From rustic tiles for a country kitchen to old school metro tiles, which bring some boho charm to a room, you can choose tile designs that work for your decor. 

Laminate flooring usually resembles wood or stone, and you can choose dark or light wood effects. There’s not as much design choice as with tiles, but if you’re looking for something simple, then laminate will be fine. 

The Bottom Line 

 
If you’d like to enjoy the luxurious appeal of tiles but don’t want to pay the installation costs, then investing in floor tiling training could save you a lot of time and money. It’s also an excellent skill to learn if you want to change careers or take on some weekend work. 

Tiles and laminate are similar in many ways, but if you’re looking for a cost-effective and durable solution, we’d recommend tiles. They look great, perform well and will withstand the test of time.

How To Install Mosaic Tiles

While mosaic tiles may be tricky to work with, they look fantastic when they’re applied.

Mosaic tiles tend to be supplied as sheets already fixed to a soft mesh backing. Ordinarily, these sheets are 300mm square, enabling large areas to be tiled without worrying about spacers between the individual mosaics.

 bathroom

When you first discover these sheets, you’ll probably breathe a huge sigh of relief! However, just because you don’t have to juggle thousands of mosaic tile pieces all the time, it doesn’t mean that installing mosaic tiles is always a simple task.

There are advantages and disadvantages to applying mosaic tiles both individually and on a backed sheet.

One downside to applying mosaic tiles using a backed sheet is that it can be challenging to apply even pressure across the whole sheet. The result could be that some tiles sink too deeply into the adhesive, whilst others are falling away.

Professional tilers will, no doubt, have accumulated methods of avoiding this issue, however, that is not to say all tilers (no matter what their experience) shouldn’t bear potential issues with mosaic tiling projects in mind.

Some tips for overcoming a sinking backed sheet (aside from having enormous, flat and extremely steady hands!) may be to invest in some rigid mesh backing sheets. These sheets are usually self-adhesive and applied straight to the back of the sheet of tiles. They can then be handled like a larger tile and will have a flat, professional look.

Putting some time into the preparation of the walls, starting with a completely flat surface will save a lot of work and time as you start to apply the mosaics.

If you are not used to working with mosaic tiles, don’t be daunted or put off!

Here are some exclusive tips for mosaic tiling:

  • Turn the sheets over to cut them – if sheets of tiles need trimming, turn them over and trim with a sharp utility knife.
  • Avoid cutting tiles – think ahead and spread the gaps, or squeeze them, to ensure a full mosaic tile fits the final gap.
  • Use professional equipment – if tiles do need cutting then aim to use the best cutter you can afford to buy or hire.
  • Clean as you go – adhesive lumps protruding through the grout spaces may end up being visible. As the adhesive starts to harden it is worth going over the gaps with an old toothbrush before grouting.
  • Go easy on the grout – with potentially hundreds of edges to be cleaned after grouting, it is worth taking more time grouting the mosaics than might be the case with larger tiles.

Mosaic tiles are commonly found used as a decorative feature, often breaking up a wall of plain tiles in a bathroom. When planning a bathroom or kitchen it might also be worth considering a mosaic splashback.

Above a sink, behind a cooking hob or kitchen worktop, a mosaic splashback can transform a room. As well as boosting the aesthetics of a home, mosaic tiles create a washable surface where water or food could stain a plain wall.

It’s not just walls that would benefit from mosaics. Consider adding a glamorous touch to the bathroom by tiling the shower floor with glass mosaic tiles. Whilst large glass tiles might be too slippery for floors, the network of grout lines on a mosaic floor will provide substantial grip.

A bathroom designer could create endless patterns with mosaics by laying them individually, maybe have a sea life scene on your shower floor.

The challenges of tiling with mosaics are almost certainly out weighed by the potential impact on your home’s charisma.

If you’d like to master your skills when it comes to tiling with mosaics, UK Pro Tiling Training can help.

Tips For Tiling A Kitchen Wall

Tiles on a kitchen wall look great. As a result, tiled kitchen walls are popular. Let’s face it when we are cooking spaghetti bolognese and stirring the sauce in a pan on the hob, we can just about handle splashes of tomato on the tiles above the cooker. When it comes to red splashes on a wall, however, we cringe. Tiles are cleaner, more hygienic and have a much better aesthetic than plain walls.

Ultimately, tiled kitchens are essential (for most of us clean-freaks anyway!).

The key to a great kitchen tiling job, from start to finish= planning!

The last thing you want to do, as a DIY’er or professional, is poorly plan the project and lose money (and time) as a result.

If you’re wanting to make a success of your kitchen tiling job, then read on. We’re experts here at UK Pro Tiling Training!

Plan your kitchen tiling project

As with any project, it is essential to plan the tiling effort in your kitchen. This means you will be much more efficient with time and far less likely to make mistakes when it comes to measuring up and buying the tiles in.

Prepare the space to be tiled

Prepare the space to be tiled thoroughly. Make sure you have removed any old wallpaper or have sanded down your walls accordingly.

If you have just had a kitchen worktop fitted, make sure it is dry and securely in place before tiling around it.

Make sure you have covered everywhere with decorating cloths to avoids any devastation caused by splashes/spillages etc.  

Have everything you need at the ready

There is nothing worse than getting halfway through a project and realising that you’ve left half of your tools and materials either a) In your van, b) in the other room or c) in the loft (this one is particularly infuriating!).

Have everything you need for the job close-by. While this sounds simple, sometimes when we focus on getting things done quickly, the basic parts of your project can be overlooked!

Of course, when you are self-employed you will most likely have everything ready-to-go in your van. It is important to keep your van organised so you can access what you need, quickly and professionally.

Don’t rush and keep the project in good order

Don’t worry about taking too much time over a project, it is far more important to do the job properly rather than rush over it.

If you’re a professional tiler, you’re far better off overestimating your time than underestimating. Your client will be far more impressed with a job done well than a job done quickly.

Be prompt to arrive at the job in hand. Be professional. Be perfectionist over the project.

Search for tips

You can find tips on our website when it comes to tiling projects, you can find various articles in our News and blog section on what not to do when it comes to tiling, as well as how to grout, tips for floor tiling and more. You can even find a guide on how to install multi-coloured kitchen tiles.

Book onto a tiling course with UK Pro Tiling Training

If you would like to learn more, then consider booking a tiling course with UK Pro Tiling Training.

How To Tile Around Windows

Tiling around a window is no easy task and that’s why it is a job most often left to a tiling professional.

After all, if mistakes are made it can be costly to put right and, ultimately, without paying significant attention to detail and doing a decent job, the end result can look terrible, leading to leaks, mould and cracks in the tile.

A tiling professional, however, is trained to tile around challenging points in the wall and can apply tiles around a window flawlessly so they look elegant and sophisticated, while offering water resistance and durability.

At UK Pro Tiling Training, we train our tiling students to tile any project with accuracy and efficiency. We, of course, instruct our students on how to tile around windows.

windows

Here’s our step-by-step guide for how to tile around windows.

Before starting the job

  • Plan the project!

Make sure you plan out the tiles and grout lines on the surrounding wall and window to make sure they all match up before applying any tiles.

  • Collect the tools and materials you need, making sure they are accessible
  • Tape measure
  • Wall spacer
  • Sponge
  • Felt tip pen
  • Mitre Block
  • Grout spreader
  • Adhesive spreader (Notched trowel)
  • Adhesive (suitable for the room)
  • Grout
  • Tiles
  • Tile nipper
  • Tile trim
  • Tile cutter
  • Gloves
  • Safety Goggles

Tiling around a window

Measure the depth of the recess up to the edge of the window.

  1. Measure each tile gap using the tile spaces.
  2. Cut the tiles to fit using a tile cutter, you can use a tile cutting machine or tile nipper.
  3. To finish the corner tiles, use a tile trim and cut at a 45 degree angle.
  4. Starting from the bottom, spread the adhesive and apply the tiles.
  5. Work up the sides and finish at the top.
  6. Use a wooden support structure to hold the tiles (specifically the top tiles) in place.
  7. Leave the adhesive to dry for 24 hours. Once dry, the tiles will be fixed in place.
  8. Apply the grout.
  9. Wipe the tiles clean with a damp sponge.

After applying the tiles

Once applying the tiles and the grout and all has dried, it is a good idea to spray the tiles around the window with grout protector spray. This will protect the tiles from any moisture, damp, mould and general wear and tear.

More advice from UK Pro Tiling Training

Learn more about tiling with UK Pro Tiling Training.

20 Bathroom Tile Patterns

Don’t be fooled into thinking that your bathroom tile patterns should be simple and plain (bland and boring…). There are huge variations of tiling options that can add a great zest of life to your bathroom.

Whether you are looking for tile ideas for small bathrooms or larger washrooms, take a look at the 20 Bathroom tile patterns below and open your mind to what tiles and tiling patterns may look good in your home.

  1. Natural stone tiles

Natural stone tiles are incredibly popular in contemporary homes for their neutral appearance and durable qualities.

Natural stone tiles can be bought in various sizes and can be used for walk-in showers too, something we teach in our natural stone tiling course.

  1. Rainbow coloured tiling pattern

If you want to add a little colour to your bathroom, why not opt for a multi-coloured tiling pattern?

Multi coloured tiles can be a good choice of colour for smaller bathrooms, and work particularly well to brighten up your additional toilet or shower room.

  1. Checkerboard tiling pattern

The checkerboard tiling pattern has been around for a number of years, however, has most recently been seen to be making a comeback!

Best installed by a professional tiler, the checkerboard tiling pattern offers a sleek and sophisticated finish.

  1. Laminate flooring

Laminate flooring is a safe bet for those on a budget as it is generally considered to be a cheaper bathroom floor option than tile.

While here at UK Pro Tiling Training we would always opt for tiles for their quality and long-lasting durability, we can understand the attraction to the lower initial cost that laminate provides.

  1. Marble tiles

Marble tiles most definitely have a luxurious edge that makes this type of tile stand out from the crowd.

Marble tiles work well in large bathrooms and kitchens.

  1. 3-layer tiling pattern

The 3-layer tiling pattern should be installed by a tiling professional and essentially features detailed ornamentation around the bath.

Another prestigious tiling pattern, the 3-layer tiling pattern can add a sense of supremity to your bathroom.

  1. Mosaic tiles

backgrounds-bathroom-blue-9082 (1)

Mosaic tiles are much smaller than standard tiles and can be applied in a straight-forward format, like in the image above, or can be applied in a more detailed, shaped design.

Professional tilers enjoy working with mosaic tiles as these tiles encourage creativity and variation.

  1. Chevron tiling pattern

The Chevron tiling pattern is a tiling pattern with a difference and will provide your bathroom with a retro feel.

The pattern will vary depending on the colours you choose. Bolder colours will result in a more obvious pattern.

  1. Porcelain tiles

Porcelain tiles are a type of ceramic tile and are incredibly popular for use in bathrooms and kitchens. The great thing about Porcelain tiles is the fact that they can be in a large format to fit in any size bathroom. Large porcelain tiles work exceptionally well for use on bathroom flooring.

  1. Straight lay tiling pattern

abstract-attractive-backdrop-8

The straight lay tiling pattern is the simplest tiling pattern of all, but it must be applied neatly to look chic and sophisticated.

The pattern consists of tiles (most often ceramic) applied in a straight horizontal pattern.

     11. Diagonal lay tiling pattern

The diagonal lay tiling pattern is similar to the tiling pattern above but, yes you guessed it, the tiles are applied on a diagonal slant.

      12.The Versailles pattern

The Versailles tiling pattern is a more complicated tiling pattern that looks effective in all areas of the home, including the bathroom, although is not recommended for very small bathrooms.

The Versailles pattern features four different tile sizes and, although, portrays a random look, requires meticulous planning. It is best installed by expert tilers.

   13. The basket weave tiling pattern

An intricate tiling pattern that portrays the weaved look, the basket weave pattern works well in bathrooms of all sizes.

   14. Herringbone tiling pattern

The Herringbone tiling pattern is another classic that can be complicated to apply and should be carried out by a professional tiler.

It is an excellent choice for making rooms look bigger and essentially consists of tiles, applied in V shapes by being placed at a 45-degree angle.

    15. Easy applicator tiles

Some tiling patterns are fused on larger tiles to make for an easier application, perfect for those looking to apply the tiles as a DIY task.

    16.The Brick Pattern

The brick pattern can make for another more retro bathroom wall tile design and is essentially made up of rectangular tiles applied in a brick wall format.

A good tiling pattern for smaller bathrooms or walls with an uneven surface, the slight misalignment of the tiles fools the eye into thinking the wall is bigger.

     17. The hexagon pattern

The hexagon pattern is made up of numerous hexagon shaped tiles applied to the wall or floor. It can be slightly more difficult to apply this shape of tile. Additionally, hexagon shaped tiles can be more difficult to come-by.

     18. Windmill tiling pattern

The windmill tiling pattern tends to be too busy a pattern for a whole wall or entire bathroom floor, however makes an affective border or feature area. It consists of four small rectangular tiles placed around a larger square tile. The windmill pattern is best applied by a professional tiler.

    19. English bond tiling pattern

The English bond tiling pattern consists of a combination of rectangular and square tiles applied in a horizontal format. This pattern makes a nice, yet similar, alternative to the brick tiling pattern.

     20. Vertical brick tiling pattern

The vertical brick tiling pattern is an alternative to the standard brick pattern and can be a popular option for contemporary homes.

White vertical brick offers the ultimate modern look for bathrooms.

More information on bathroom tile patterns from UK Pro Tiling Training

If you would like to expand your knowledge of tiling patterns with one of our professional tiling courses, then please do not hesitate to contact us at UK Pro Tiling Training.